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How to find out if your product or substance is regulated under the TDGR.

September 11, 2020

How to find out if your product or substance is regulated under the TDGR.

Manufacturer’s and suppliers are required by law to confirm whether they're product or substance meets the definition for a dangerous good. The TDG Regulations is broken down into 16 Parts and 3 Schedules, shippers must determine if their product or substance falls under any of the 9 UN classes. If the product meets any of the classification criteria in Part 2, then it is regulated under the TDG Regulations, some exemptions may apply, check Part 1 exemptions.

Be sure to examine all of the TDG requirements. For example, if your product is not listed in Schedule 1 or Schedule 3, you must test your product according to Part 2, of the dangerous goods regulations.

Manufacturer’s are required to keep the classification information for up to 5 years, a dangerous goods inspector my request proof of classification.

Distributor’s who re-ship or re-direct a product must confirm the product or substance is or isn’t a dangerous good, this can be done by checking the manufacturer’s safety data sheet (SDS) section (Section 14). 

If an SDS is not available and the manufacturer or distributor are no longer in business, you will need to determine whether the product is a dangerous good by the same means as the original manufacturer.






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